Student Nurses 2017

School of Nursing Class of 2017

The oPt is facing a nursing shortage. Among OECD countries (including the United States, the United Kingdom and Israel), there are 8.9 nurses per 1,000 people (OECD Health Statistics, 2014). This is compared to just 2.2 nurses per 1,000 people in the West Bank and 3.4 nurses per 1,000 people in the Gaza Strip (Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics, 2014).

The delivery of our expert services depends on employing excellent staff who have been trained to a high standard. This is particularly important in the oPt where the conflict and blockade of the region has significantly affected an individual’s ability to access higher education within the oPt whilst the movement restrictions of the region have made it extremely difficult to gain qualifications outside its borders.

Seven students started the course in December 2016. The course is a full-time, 12 month course comprising of two main modules, the first focusing on theoretical knowledge and clinical experience and the second on community ophthalmic health. Students finish with a three month consolidation period at one of our medical centres, in order to strengthen and fortify their knowledge in a demanding and stimulating environment. The nurses are financially supported throughout the course so that their financial situations are not a barrier to them undertaking the training. Below is a brief overview of our 2016/2017 intake of student nurses.
 

Our new intake of nurses hail from all over the oPt and from all walks of life but have in common a compassion for their fellow human and drive and ambition to achieve their goals.

School of Nursing Update, February 2017

Nasrallah Khalileh, our Senior Lecturer at the nursing school provided us with this small update in February:

"Our seven students are progressing well and in line with their teaching clinical and theoretical program. So far, they completed the anatomy and physiology of the eye and part of the course eye diseases, pharmacology, microbiology under supervision by staff and their mentors."

Meet our Student Nurses 2017

Abeer

Abeer

Abeer studied nursing at Al-Quds University in Jerusalem, following in the footsteps of parents who also are employed as medical professionals. Abeer feels a great sense of responsibility in her nursing career. She states that: 

“The ophthalmic course has achieved my career dream of being a specialised in a very reputable nursing field especially it will give me the opportunity to help people who have eye diseases. In Palestine, I realized how much the community needs our ophthalmic nursing care because many people are living in the dark.”

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Ahmed

Ahmed

Ahmed has recently graduated from Al-Makassed Hospital Nursing College in Jerusalem and was employed by Jerusalem Medical Center. Working in the Eye Clinic there inspired him to become an ophthalmic nurse and he sought training at St John. Ahmed says

 “I am eager to complete the course and to hold a specialist ophthalmic nurse degree. I would like to continue provide ophthalmic nursing in primary eye clinics and provide health promotion.”

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Hussam

Hussam

Husam completed a bachelor degree in Nursing at An-Najah National University in 2016. He was offered the role as a staff nurse in Nablus, however his friend Munther, who graduated from the School of Nursing in 2016, recommended that Husam join St John. Husam decided to decline the job offer and enrol on our School of Nursing course, stating that:

 “I was really excited to get a scholarship to become a specialized nurse and when I was accepted for the course, I have known that I will improve my future profession and contribute to eye nursing care in Palestine.”

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Isra

Isra

Israa, the daughter of a nurse, has dreamt of working in the medical profession since she was young. She graduated from Bethlehem University in June 2016 with a bachelor degree in Nursing. Israa says that:

 “I decided to do this training because I think it will shape my future profession especially as ophthalmic nursing is very rare. Besides, St. John has an excellent reputation in training ophthalmic nurses... Seeing children at St. John treated for eye diseases is very influential and make any student nurse very interested in ophthalmic nursing and helping children to see the world around them.”

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Raneen

Raneen

After graduating from Birzeit University in 2016, Raneen spent three months interning as a nurse in Germany. Raneen undertook one month of her training in ophthalmic operating rooms and during this time was inspired to become a specialist ophthalmic nurse. As said by Raneen:

 “I decided to study Nursing for many reasons. For me, Nursing is not only a university degree or a career, it is a way of living with colleagues and eliminating people suffering, it is a humanitarian mission which I very much appreciate.”

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Sarah

Sarah

In 2016, Sarah graduated from Bethlehem University’s faculty of Nursing. She decided to pursue a career in specialist ophthalmic nursing after hearing about St John’s School of Nursing from her now course tutor. Sarah says:

“My grandmother was treated at St John eye hospital for many years and was cared for by ophthalmic nurses. She inspired me… I have so many great hopes about becoming a specialist ophthalmic nurse”. 

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Suzana

Suzana
Motivated by her sick sister at home, Suzana decided to undertake a degree in nursing at Berzeit University. In one of her lectures, she learnt about the causes of blindness in the oPt and St John’s specialist School of Nursing which helps to elimate these. Suzana is enjoying her course so far, stating that:

 “I am really finding the course very interesting and the hospital is very supportive. The nurses’ home is fantastic and by now I have many friends at the hospital. After graduation, I like to give ophthalmic nursing care to children in the hospital and in community.”

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